Potentiometer

How To : Circuit bend a battery-powered toy

Take your old electronics and make them scream with glitchy goodness. This an extremely easy project and makes a great project for first-time solderers. Circuit bending involves taking electronic devices that make multiple sounds and wiring in switches to set off glitches or l ...more

News : Touchpad Made with Paper and Pencil Scribbles

Who says nothing productive ever came out of doodling? Certainly not the hacker responsible for this fun (and at least somewhat functional) paper-and-pencil touchpad, which takes advantage of the natural conductivity of graphite: There isn’t much to explain here. It just uses ...more

How To : Repair Atari paddles once and for all

This is a simple easy to follow walkthrough on replacing the Potentiometer on the old Atari 2600 paddles. This is a classic video game console from the 80s. The paddles are the old school controllers for the Atari console.

How To : Construct a "rumble mouse"

This video demonstrates a project taken from "Make" magazine. Viewers will learn how to modify an ordinary computer mouse with a vibration unit for use with PC games, similar to the rumble controllers sold for video-game consoles, to make gaming more fun. Step by step, the vi ...more

How To : Embed lights into a colorful brooch with LilyPad

Get started with the LilyPad Arduino! It's a sewable microcontroller that lets you embed lights, sounds, sensors, and much more into your wearables, perfect for clothing and accessories. In this Make Magazine intermediate, soft circuit, video tutorial, you'll see how to sew up ...more

News : Master Nerd Births Perfect Copy Cat Bot

Can't help but smile at this goofy, endearing nerd "master" (Vitalijus Rodnovas) guiding his copy-cat protege robot (coined Waldo). The rig allows Waldo to mimic Rodnovas' body movements in actual real time. Hackaday has dug up the HowTo notes: "...The project page is slight ...more

How To : Use circuit bending

Circuit bending an audio device typically involves removing the rear panel of the device and connecting any two circuit locations with a "jumper" wire, sending current from one part of the circuit into another. Results are monitored through either the device's internal speaker ...more

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